Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Management Addressed in New Tomato Webcast

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug on tomato

Few crop pests have received as much attention as the brown marmorated stink bug, and for good reason. Aside from heavily damaging various crops in the mid-Atlantic U.S., this economically-important pest has been also been spreading westward across the country.

The latest Focus on Tomato presentation, authored by Dr. Tom Kuhar, Associate Professor of Entomology at Virginia Tech, helps consultants, growers, applied researchers and other practitioners better understand and manage the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), particularly in tomato crops.

The presentation includes:

  • A short biological and ecological background of the BMSB

Few crop pests have received as much attention as the brown marmorated stink bug, and for good reason. Aside from heavily damaging various crops in the mid-Atlantic U.S., this economically-important pest has been also been spreading westward across the country.

The latest Focus on Tomato presentation, authored by Dr. Tom Kuhar, Associate Professor of Entomology at Virginia Tech, helps consultants, growers, applied researchers and other practitioners better understand and manage the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), particularly in tomato crops.

The presentation includes:

  • A short biological and ecological background of the BMSB
  • Illustrations of the BMSB and the damage they cause
  • Population data for tomato crops
  • Insecticide efficacy data for managing the BMSB
  • Best BMSB management practices

This presentation is open access through October 31, 2012 and can be viewed at http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/tomato/BMSB/.

Users can view other recent webcasts in the Focus on Potato resource at http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/fot.

Focus on Tomato is a publication of the Plant Management Network (PMN), a nonprofit online publisher whose mission is to enhance the health, management, and production of agricultural and horticultural crops. It achieves this mission through applied, science-based resources. PMN is jointly managed by the American Society of Agronomy, American Phytopathological Society and Crop Science Society of America.

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